Ten Things I Loved about Japan

Our family had a great time in Japan.  While I loved many things about Japan, here are ten things I especially loved:

1.  Excellent Rail System

During our round-the-world trip, we often have rented cars to travel in different countries.  I am a big proponent of public transportation, but with four travelers, it often is cheaper to have a rental car than to buy tickets for each one of us.  Plus, a rental car provides flexibility.  In Japan, however, we used the train system to travel, and it was a great decision for our family.  We purchased a Japan Rail Pass, which you must buy outside of Japan, and it allowed us to travel between major cities such as Tokyo, Kyoto, and Hiroshima.  At times, such as in Hiroshima, the JR Pass allowed us to travel on buses, and in Tokyo, we used our JR Pass on many subway lines.  We also used the JR Pass to travel by monorail to Tokyo’s Narita Airport for our departing flight.  It was well worth the expense and saved us considerable time and money.

Japan Rail Pass

2.  Shinkansen (Bullet Trains)

While the bullet trains are part of the rail system, they deserve special mention.  All four of us are big fans of the bullet trains!  We loved the fast and smooth rides as we traveled around the country.  Here’s a tip:  if you arrive at a station with enough time, you may stop by a ticket office and get a reserved seat on the bullet train, which we did on a number of occasions.  If you are rushing to make a train, which you can be sure will depart right on time, then you can ride in certain cars without a reserved seat.  We did this a number of times, and it was just as comfortable.

Shinkansen

3.  Biking around Kyoto

During our stay at the Apple House in Kyoto (a house we highly recommend with a wonderful host, Hiroko James,), we used two bicycles that Hiroko provided and rented two more bikes.  We pedaled our way around Kyoto, which was both good exercise and a fantastic way to see the city.  It is easy to park a bike nearly anywhere in Kyoto.  In many cases, you can simply park outside a building on the sidewalk with other bikes, or you may use bicycle parking stations located throughout the city.

Bicylcing Kyoto

4.  Japanese Food

We ate, and ate, and ate across Japan.  And the food was delicious!  From a Japanese breakfast at Ryokan Yamakazi (a traditional Japanese inn); to sushi; to noodles; to Syojin Ryori, Buddhist vegetarian cuisine at Shukubo Eko-in Temple in Koyasan; to steamed buns; to dumplings and tempura, the food was excellent.  Here’s a tip:  for the best prices, purchase excellent prepared food in grocery stores or in food markets on the bottom floors of department stores. I loved Japanese food before visiting the country; I crave it now!  (In fact, I had it for lunch today!)

Rachel eating noodles

Japanese breakfast

Dean Sushi

Steamed Bun

5.  Japanese Architecture

Thankfully, we were able to stay at places with traditional features such as tatami (straw mats), futon (sleeping mattresses), shoji (sliding doors), and sento (Japanese baths).  Loved them!

Ryokan

6.  Samurai

We learned about samurai, military nobility of feudal Japan, who are not to be confused with ninja, more mercenary fighters.  We had a great time at Samurai Kembo in Kyoto.  It’s a bit expensive, but if you have a chance to go, I encourage you to do it.  We are glad we did!

Samurai

7.  Japanese Traditions

Thanks to my wife, Lisa, who took the lead in organizing and booking our Japanese trip, we enjoyed special experiences of the Japanese Tea Ceremony and Kimono.  All four of us participated in a tea ceremony, and in another adventure, Lisa and our daughter, Rachel, were dressed in Kimono.

Rachel Lisa Tea Ceremony

Tea Ceremony Jonathan

Kimono

8.  History

I have written in a previous blog post about our trip to Hiroshima, which was chilling and moving, and I am grateful to learn more about this part of Japan’s history.  Japan’s history, of course, is much, much longer, wider, and deeper than World War II, and I loved learning more about Japanese history with special attention to its religious history.

Floating Torii gate at Itsukushima Shinto Shrine, Miyajima

Floating Torii gate at Itsukushima Shinto Shrine, Miyajima

9.  Japanese Machines

If there is a way to enhance life through automation, I think the Japanese have found it.  We loved the ubiquitous vending machines, which dispensed both hot and cold drinks from the same machine.  Some vending machines will even scan your body and suggest the drink you should select.  While the vending machines were fun and nice, the Japanese toilets were the best machine by far!  With a number of features such as heated seats and built in warm-water bidet functions, Japanese toilets are the best I have ever encountered.  We are trying to determine how we can have one installed in our home in the United States.

Vending Machine

Notice the hand washing basin at the top of the toilet

Notice the hand washing basin at the top of the toilet

10.  Kindness of People

We fell in love with Japanese people.  We left Japan with new friends who showered us with kindness:  Hiroko James, Naoto Nakamura, and Ryuichi Tsubuku.  We also were treated with kindness by countless people such as fellow passengers on trains, workers at markets, officials at train stations, and one dear man who took about fifteen minutes to walk us through streets of Tokyo to show us our destination.  While we bowed and said, “Arigato, Thank you,” it was not nearly enough to convey our true gratitude for their kindness.

Rachel and Hair Dresser

Noodle House Family

4 thoughts on “Ten Things I Loved about Japan

  1. Marcia Harris

    With all the bad news we hear about things happening all over the world, it’s so refreshing for you to share the good! Keep having a wonderful time and absorbing good memories.

    Reply
    1. Dean Allen Post author

      Thanks, Marcia. We have encountered wonderful places and even more wonderful people on this trip. As we travel, we also think about and feel deeply connected to you and other dear friends at home. I hope Lent has been meaningful for you and Holy Week will be very good. I will think of you especially during those days. Peace, Dean

      Reply
  2. Melanie Vick

    Can’t imagine better ambassadors than you, Lisa, Jonathan and Rachel. You show such respect and appreciation for other cultures. You make the rest of us American travelers look good. Love the Samurai Allens! Have enjoyed watching your children mature through the photos over the last year. Looks to me like you and Lisa seem to have grown younger! Did you find the Fountain of Youth in your travels? Best wishes. ~Melanie

    Reply
    1. Dean Allen Post author

      Thank you, Melanie. It was wonderful to receive your comment. We have thought of you many times on our trip because we know how much you love traveling and experiencing new places, people, and possibilities. Where are you headed next?

      Reply

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